+52 (664) 2646626 +1 (619) 304-0088 Consultorio 312

info@omanacare.com

CHRONIC PAIN

In Tijuana Sin Dolor we have the right treatments to deal with the diseases that can cause chronic pain.

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by generalized musculoskeletal pain accompanied by problems of fatigue, sleep, memory and mood. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies the painful sensations that affect the way the brain processes pain signals.

Sometimes the symptoms begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms accumulate gradually over time without any single trigger event.

Women are much more likely to develop fibromyalgia than men. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression.

Neuropathic pain is a state of chronic and complex pain that is usually accompanied by tissue injury. With neuropathic pain, the nerve fibers themselves could be damaged, dysfunctional or injured. These damaged nerve fibers send incorrect signals to other pain centers. The impact of a nerve fiber injury includes a change in nerve function at both the site of the injury and the areas around the injury. (clevelandclinic.org)

Neuropathic pain – also known as nerve pain – is a type of chronic pain that occurs when the nerves in the central nervous system are injured or damaged. If you or a loved one has nerve pain, you know that it can erode the quality of life.

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a long-term complication of diabetes. Exposure to high glucose levels over a prolonged period of time causes damage to the peripheral nerves – the nerves that go to the arms, hands, legs and feet.

Although diabetic peripheral neuropathy can occur in many places in the body, the most common symptoms are abdominal sensations in the toes and feet, including:

  • Strong, sharp pains
  • Burning
  • Shudder
  • A feeling of being pricked with pins
  • Throbbing
  • Numbness (not able to feel pain properly, hot or cold)

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy increases the risk of foot ulcers and amputation. Due to damage to the nerves in their feet and fingers, people with diabetes who have diabetic peripheral neuropathy often do not notice small cuts, sores or blisters in these areas. If left untreated, these small wounds can easily become infected, lead to gangrene, and over time may require amputation of the affected area.

Neuropathy refers to any type of damage to nerves or injuries. Neuropathy is common in people with HIV and AIDS and may be related to HIV infection itself and / or the drugs used to treat HIV. It occurs in 30% to 60% of people with HIV infection and significantly deteriorates the quality of life. It is often the right treatment.

The nervous system is formed by the central nervous system (CNS), composed of the brain and spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system (SNP), composed of the nerves that connect the central nervous system to the skin, muscles and organs in the whole body. The peripheral nerves are responsible for the sensation (sensory nerves), movement (motor nerves), and the automatic functions of the body (autonomic nerves). The damage to the nerves in the SNP is called peripheral neuropathy.

Some anti-HIV drugs, in particular, dideoxynucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or ‘d’, the drug can cause peripheral neuropathy. Such agents are known as neurotoxic. There are several different forms of peripheral neuropathy, which are classified according to the types of affected nerves:

  • Sensory neuropathy affects the nerves that transmit information from the sense organs and those responsible for sensation (pain, pressure, heat) in the skin.
  • Motor neuropathy affects the nerves that transmit instructions from the spinal cord to the muscles and other parts of the body that perform the voluntary action.
  • Autonomic neuropathy affects the nerves that control the body’s automatic functions, such as breathing, heartbeat, sweating, and emptying the stomach.

In people with HIV and AIDS, the most common neuropathy is symmetric distal polyneuropathy, which means it starts in the extremities, affects both sides of the body, and involves multiple nerves. Neuropathy induced by anti-HIV medications is sometimes called toxic antiretroviral neuropathy.

Neuropathy refers to any type of damage to nerves or injuries. Neuropathy is common in people with HIV and AIDS and may be related to HIV infection itself and / or the drugs used to treat HIV. It occurs in 30% to 60% of people with HIV infection and significantly deteriorates the quality of life. It is often the right treatment.

The nervous system is formed by the central nervous system (CNS), composed of the brain and spinal cord and the peripheral nervous system (SNP), composed of the nerves that connect the central nervous system to the skin, muscles and organs in the whole body. The peripheral nerves are responsible for the sensation (sensory nerves), movement (motor nerves), and the automatic functions of the body (autonomic nerves). The damage to the nerves in the SNP is called peripheral neuropathy.

Some anti-HIV drugs, in particular, dideoxynucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or ‘d’, the drug can cause peripheral neuropathy. Such agents are known as neurotoxic. There are several different forms of peripheral neuropathy, which are classified according to the types of affected nerves:

  • Sensory neuropathy affects the nerves that transmit information from the sense organs and those responsible for sensation (pain, pressure, heat) in the skin.
  • Motor neuropathy affects the nerves that transmit instructions from the spinal cord to the muscles and other parts of the body that perform the voluntary action.
  • Autonomic neuropathy affects the nerves that control the body’s automatic functions, such as breathing, heartbeat, sweating, and emptying the stomach.

In people with HIV and AIDS, the most common neuropathy is symmetric distal polyneuropathy, which means it starts in the extremities, affects both sides of the body, and involves multiple nerves. Neuropathy induced by anti-HIV medications is sometimes called toxic antiretroviral neuropathy.

Phantom pain is pain that feels as if it came from a part of the body that is no longer there. Doctors thought this phenomenon after amputation was a psychological problem, but experts now recognize that these real sensations originate in the spinal cord and brain.

Although phantom pain occurs most often in people who have had an arm or leg removed, the disorder can also occur after surgeries to remove other parts of the body, such as the breast, penis, eyes or tongue.

For some people, phantom pain gets better over time without treatment. For others, managing phantom pain can be a challenge. You and your doctor can work together to treat phantom pain effectively with medications or other therapies.

The postherpetic neuralgia is a complication of herpes, which is caused by the varicella virus (herpes zoster). Postherpetic neuralgia affects the nerve and skin fibers, causing burning that lasts a long time after the rash and the blisters of the shingles disappear.

The risk of postherpetic neuralgia increases with age, which mainly affects people over 60. There is no cure, but treatments can relieve symptoms. For most people, postherpetic neuralgia improves with time.

After undergoing breast cancer surgery, some women have problems with nerves (neuropathic) pain in the chest wall, underarm, and / or arm that does not go away over time.

This is called post-mastectomy pain syndrome (PMP), since it was first described in women who had a mastectomy, but it can also occur after breast-conserving surgery (such as a lumpectomy).

It is important to talk with your doctor about any pain you have. PMPS can make you not use your arm the way it should, and over time you could lose the ability to use it normally.

PMPS can be treated. Some pain medications, such as opioids (narcotics) do not always work well for nerve pain, but there are medications and treatments that work for this type of pain. Talk to your doctor to get control of the pain you need.

Back Pain

Back pain can be caused by a variety of problems with any part of the complex interconnected network of the spine muscles, nerves, bones, tendons or discs in the lumbar spine. Typical sources of low back pain include:

  • The large nerve roots in the lower back that go to the legs may be irritated
  • The smaller nerves that supply the lower back can be irritated
  • The large pairs of muscles of the back (erector spinae) can be subjected to great pressures
  • Bones, ligaments or joints may be damaged
  • An intervertebral disc may be degenerating

An irritation or problem with any of these structures can cause lower back pain and / or pain that is radiated or referred to other parts of the body. Many of the lower back problems also cause muscle back spasms, which do not sound like much, but can cause severe pain and disability.

While low back pain is very common, the symptoms and severity of low back pain are very varied. A simple low back muscle strain can be atrocious enough to require a visit to the emergency room, while a degenerative disc can cause only mild symptoms, intermittent discomfort.

Hip Pain

Hip pain is a common complaint that can be caused by a wide variety of problems. The exact location of your hip pain can provide valuable clues to the underlying cause.

Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the inside of the hip or groin.

The hip pain on the outside of your hip, thigh, or outer buttock is usually caused by problems with the muscles, ligaments, tendons, and other soft tissues that surround the hip joint.

Knee Pain

Knee pain can be caused by problems with the knee joint itself, or it can be caused by conditions that affect the soft tissues – the ligaments, tendons or bursas – that surround the knee.

The severity of knee pain can vary widely. Some people may feel a slight sting, while others may experience debilitating knee pain that interferes with their day-to-day activities. In most cases, personal care measures can help deal with knee pain.

Ankle Pain

Your ankle is an intricate network of bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Strong enough to support the body’s weight and allow it to move, the ankle can be prone to injury and pain.

You may feel the pain on the inside or outside of your ankle or along the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the heel bone.

Although mild ankle pain often responds well to home treatments, it may take time to resolve. You should consult your doctor for severe ankle pain, especially if an injury is followed.

Pain in the Facet Joints

To avoid excessive movement, excessive twisting, or tipping, the segments of the spine are stabilized by a series of structures that, however, retain the flexibility needed to rotate, look around and move around.

Articular facets, or joints with “small faces” are found on each level of the spine (except at the upper level) and provide approximately 20% of the torsion (twist) stability in the neck and lower back.

The vertebrae of the chest area are usually much less mobile and allows a small amount of forward / backward and a little lateral tilt, and very little twisting.

Headaches of Cervical Origin

Neck pain and cervical muscle pain are common and prominent symptoms of primary headaches. Less often, the headache may actually arise from the bony structures or soft tissues of the neck, a condition known as headache of cervical origin.

Cervicogenic headache can be a disconcerting pain disorder that is refractory to treatment if it is not recognized. Pathophysiology and the origin of the pain of the disease have been the subject of debate, but the pain is likely to be referred to one or more muscular, neurogenic, bony, articular or vascular structures in the neck.

Pain of the Temporomandibular Joint

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the joint that connects the mandible (lower jaw) to your skull. The joint can be found on both sides of your head in front of your ears. Allows the jaw to open and close, allowing you to talk and eat.

This abbreviation is also used to refer to a group of health problems related to your jaw. These disorders can cause joint tenderness, facial pain and difficulty moving the joint.

According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, as many as 10 million Americans suffer from TMJ. ATM is more common in women than in men. These disorders are treatable, but there are many possible different causes. This can make the diagnosis difficult.

Occipital Neuralgia

Occipital neuralgia is a condition in which the nerves that extend from the top of the spinal cord through the scalp, called the occipital nerves, are inflamed or injured. You may feel pain in the back of your head or the base of your skull.

People may confuse with a migraine or other types of headache, since the symptoms may be similar. However, the treatments for these conditions are very different, so it is important to consult your doctor to obtain a correct diagnosis.

Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal nerve, which leads to the sensation of the face to your brain. If you have trigeminal neuralgia, even mild stimulation of the face – such as brushing teeth or putting on makeup – can cause a shock of unbearable pain.

You may initially experience short and mild attacks. However, trigeminal neuralgia can progress and cause longer, more frequent fights of acute pain. Trigeminal neuralgia affects women more than men, and is more likely to occur in people who are older than 50.

Due to the variety of treatment options available and trigeminal neuralgia is guaranteed it does not necessarily mean that you are doomed to a life of pain. Doctors can usually manage trigeminal neuralgia effectively with medication, injections or surgery.

Pain of the Temporomandibular Joint

  • Abdominal pain
  • The pain of cancer
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Pancreas pain
  • Surgical pain syndromes
  • Pain in the ribs
  • Testicular pain